Tag Archives: Canadian Payroll Association

Financial education: A benefit employees want to see under the tree

A survey released last month in support of Financial Literacy Month (#FLM2017) by the Canadian Payroll Association reveals that Canadian workers would be very pleased if their employers decided to offer or enhance financial education programs this holiday season.

In fact employees have a strong appetite for employer-provided financial education programs, with an astonishing 82% indicating they would be interested if employers offered financial information at work. But, busy workers have timing expectation — 54% would prefer that employers offered lunch and learns but only 8% would be interested if information was offered after work hours.

Currently, 38% of Canadians rely on financial advisors and banks for financial and retirement planning advice. A further 27% of people surveyed lean on friends, family and the internet for this important information.

Employees’ appetite for financial education at work is not surprising, considering results of the CPA’s National Payroll Week Employee Survey revealing that nearly half (47%) of working Canadians are living pay cheque to pay cheque. Survey results also illustrate that many Canadians are challenged by debt, are worried about their local economy and are not saving enough for retirement.

In addition, the more recent November 2017 survey results show that working Canadians are experiencing a high level of financial stress, and that too few are keeping a close eye on their finances. Half of employees feel that financial stress is impacting their work performance. What’s more, just 52% say they budget frequently; with an astounding 31% of this group saying that they keep their budget in their head. Of those who do budget, 52% say they usually or always stick to their budget.

“We know that many working Canadians are struggling to make ends meet financially and they need help,” says Janice MacLellan, Vice President of Operations at the CPA. “While many Canadians are well-intentioned, our survey results show that they are not making enough progress towards financial health, and ultimately, this is impacting their work and their lives.”

The CPA continues to champion its key message “Pay Yourself First” to prepare for a healthy financial future. Currently 61% of Canadian employers offer a “Pay Yourself First” option through payroll which enables employees to set up automatic payroll deductions to direct a portion of their net pay into a separate retirement or savings account. Of those employers that do not currently offer this option, an additional one-third are considering making it available.

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Members of the Saskatchewan Pension Plan can pay themselves first by having contributions withdrawn directly from their bank account using the PAC system on the 1st or 15th of the month. Other methods of contribution to SPP include: using a contribution form to contribute at your financial institution; using your VISA or MasterCard; through online banking; or by mail to the Plan office in Kindersley.

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Written by Sheryl Smolkin
Sheryl Smolkin LLB., LLM is a retired pension lawyer and President of Sheryl Smolkin & Associates Ltd. For over a decade, she has enjoyed a successful encore career as a freelance writer specializing in retirement, employee benefits and workplace issues. Sheryl and her husband Joel are empty-nesters, residing in Toronto with their cockapoo Rufus.

Nearly half of Saskatchewan residents live from pay cheque to pay cheque

By Sheryl Smolkin

For many working Canadians and for those in Saskatchewan, the road to a comfortable retirement is becoming longer and more difficult.  A large portion of the working population is living pay cheque to pay cheque, unable to save, and worried about their local economy, according to the Canadian Payroll Association’s recently released eighth annual Research Survey of Employed Canadians

The survey reveals that only 36% of working Canadians and 37% of those in Saskatchewan expect the economy in their city or town to improve in the coming year.

Many working Canadians are cash-strapped and barely making ends meet. Nationally, and in Saskatchewan, almost half (48%) report it would be difficult to meet their financial obligations if their pay cheque was delayed by even a single week.

“A significant percentage of working Canadians carry debt, have a gloomy view of their local economy and are fearful of rising interest rates, inflation, and costs of living,” says Patrick Culhane, the Canadian Payroll Association’s President and CEO. “In this time of uncertainty, people need to take control of their finances by saving more. ‘Paying yourself first’ (by automatically directing at least 10% of net pay into a separate savings account or retirement plan) enables employees to exercise some control over their financial future.”

Incomes flat, saving capacity drained by spending and debt

“Survey data suggests that household income growth has stalled, as respondents reporting household income above $100K has hardly increased in five years,” says Alec Milne, Principal at research provider Framework Partners. “In fact, real incomes have actually declined when inflation is taken into account.”

While pay has remained largely unchanged, employees’ spending and debt levels have affected their ability to save. Nationally, and in Saskatchewan, 40% of employees say they spend all of or more than their net pay

Despite employees’ challenging financial situations, only 28% of respondents across the country cite higher wages as a top priority.  Instead, an overwhelming 48% nationally, are most interested in better work-life balance and a healthy work environment. In Saskatchewan only 25% prioritize higher wages, while 45% are most interested in better work-life balance and a healthy work environment.

“Clearly, many Canadians are concerned about their financial situation,” says Lucy Zambon, the Canadian Payroll Association’s Board Chair.  “But better work-life balance does not have to mean reduced financial security if you spend within your means.”

Over one-third (39%) of working Canadians feel overwhelmed by their level of debt, an increase from the three-year average of 36%. Debt levels have risen over the past year for 31% of respondents. In Saskatchewan, 35% feel overwhelmed by debt and 35% say their debt level has increased this year. Unfortunately, 11% nationally and 9% in Saskatchewan (among the lowest nationwide) do not think they will ever be debt free.

Similar to prior years, 93% of respondents nationally carry debt (96% in Saskatchewan). Over half of respondents nationally (58%) said that debt and the economy are the biggest impediments to saving for retirement.

Retirement savings fall short, retirement pushed back

Half of Canadians and 59% of Saskatchewan respondents think they will need a retirement nest-egg of at least $1 million.

Unable to save adequately, the vast majority of working Canadians have fallen far behind their retirement goals, with 76% nationally and 74% in Saskatchewan saying they have saved only one-quarter or less of what they feel they will need.

Nearly one-half of employees nationally (45%) now expect they’ll have to work longer than they had originally planned five years ago, primarily because they have not saved enough. Nationally, respondents’ average target retirement has risen to 62, whereas these same respondents’ target retirement age five years ago was 60, before reality set in.

Saskatchewan Pension Plan makes retirement savings easy

The Saskatchewan Pension Plan makes saving for retirement easy by offering all Canadians between the ages of 18 and 71 a flexible series of contribution options that can be modified at any time. Plan members can contribute up to $2,500/year:

  • Directly from their bank account or credit card using the PAC system on the 1st or 15th of the month using a semi-monthly, monthly, semiannual, or annual schedule.
  • Using VISA® or MasterCard® online at SaskPension.com or by calling toll free, 1-800-667-7153.
  • At financial institutions, in branch or online
  • By mailing directly to the SPP office in Kindersley

Members can also transfer up to $10,000/year from another RRSP into their SPP account.

Saskatchewan residents need to save more for retirement

By Sheryl Smolkin

A National payroll survey conducted in September 2015 by the Canadian Payroll Association finds three-quarters of working Canadians have saved just 25% or less of their retirement goal, and many expect to work longer. In Saskatchewan, many employees are living pay cheque to pay cheque, most are not saving enough and economic pessimism is high.

The study reveals that the vast majority of employees are nowhere near reaching their retirement savings goals, and more than one-third (35%) expect to work longer than they had originally planned five years ago, with their average target retirement age rising from 58 to 63 over that period.

Nearly one-quarter (21%) say they’ll now need to work an additional four years or more. “I am not saving enough money” was the top reason for delayed retirement.

Far behind retirement goals

Nationally, three-quarters (76%) of working Canadians say they have put aside a quarter or less of what they will need in retirement (up from an average of 74% over the past three years). In Saskatchewan, the number is 71%. And even among those closer to retirement (50 and older), a disturbing 48% are still less than a quarter of the way to their retirement savings goal.

Not only are employed Canadians finding it difficult to save for their retirement, many think they will need a big nest-egg. Half nationally (and 61% in Saskatchewan) think they will need more than $1 million in savings when they exit the workforce.

Most Canadian employees do not expect their financial situation to get better any time soon. Just 33% nationally and 36% in Saskatchewan expect the economy to improve over the next year. That’s down an average of 8% nationally, and down a noteworthy 24% in Saskatchewan, over the past three years.

Living pay cheque to pay cheque

Nationally, a large proportion (48%) report that it would be difficult to meet their financial obligations if their pay cheque was delayed by a single week. In Saskatchewan, 43% say they are living pay cheque to pay cheque.

Illustrating just how strapped some employees are, 24% nationally and 17% in Saskatchewan report that they probably could not come up with $2,000 if an emergency arose within the next month.

While more employees nationally say they are trying to save more (71% now, up from 66% over the previous three years), fewer are actually able to do so, with 62% succeeding in their savings efforts (down from an average of 66% over the past three years). In Saskatchewan, just 56% are succeeding in their savings efforts (the lowest of all the provinces/regions).

And savings rates continue to be meagre. About half (47%) of employed Canadians are putting away just 5% or less of their pay. In Saskatchewan, the number is 53% (the top province for number of employees who are under-saving for retirement). Financial planning experts generally recommend a retirement savings rate of at least 10% of net pay.

Nationally, 36% of employees (and 38% in Saskatchewan) say they feel overwhelmed by their level of debt.

“Canadians are saying they are having a difficult time making ends meet, and they are not putting enough aside to reach their own retirement goals,” notes Canadian Payroll Association President and CEO, Patrick Culhane. Edna Stack, Canadian Payroll Association Board Chair, explains: “Payroll professionals can help by setting up automatic deductions from an employee’s pay cheque to a savings plan or retirement program. This is the most effective way for an employee to save, so they can get on the path to a more secure financial future.”

The Saskatchewan Pension Plan allows Canadians with sufficient RRSP contribution room to save up to $2,500/year and transfer in an additional $10,000/year from another RRSP. Members can contribute online using a Visa or MasterCard. SPP contributions can also be made automatically from a member’s bank account.

More Saskatchewan residents living pay cheque to pay cheque

By Sheryl Smolkin

SHUTTERSTOCK

More working Canadians and Saskatchewan residents are living pay cheque to pay cheque, As a result they are saving less and falling further behind in meeting their retirement goals according to the sixth annual National Payroll Week Research Survey, conducted by the Canadian Payroll Association (CPA). 

Nationally, more than half of employees (51%) report that it would be difficult to meet their financial obligations if their pay cheque was delayed by a single week. In Saskatchewan, the percentage is even higher – 56% say they are living pay cheque to pay cheque, up from an average of 52% over the previous three years.

Another finding confirms that more than a quarter of those surveyed are living very close to the edge. A total of 26% say they probably could not pull together $2,000 over the next month if an emergency expense arose. In Saskatchewan, 28% would be hard pressed to come up with the funds.

The low savings rate has become even more prevalent this year. Half of all employees nationally (57% in Saskatchewan) are putting away just 5% or less of their pay, up from an average of 47% of employees over the past three years (41% in Saskatchewan). Financial planning experts generally recommend a retirement savings rate of 10% of net pay.

Part of the reason for low savings is that 44% of employees nationally, and 54% of employees in Saskatchewan, are spending all, or more than, their net pay. Among the top reasons for increased spending, the survey identifies: children, home renovations and education.

“Those who are trying to save but finding it hard to succeed should consider directing a portion of net pay into a separate savings account and/or a retirement savings program,” says CPA President and CEO, Patrick Culhane. “They can speak to their organization’s payroll practitioner to arrange this.” 

Retiring older and needing more retirement savings 

Fully 79% of Canadian employees and 75% of Saskatchewan employees expect to delay retirement until age 60 or older – up from 70% and 57% respectively over the past three years. The number one reason cited for retiring later in life is that employees are not able to save enough money.

Employees continue to raise the bar in terms of what they think they will need to retire comfortably:

  • Fewer now feel that savings under $500,000 will be sufficient (10% in Saskatchewan, down from an average of 11% over the past three years; 18% nationally, down from an average of 21% over the past three years).
  • Many think between $500,000 and $2 million will be required (71% in Saskatchewan, down 1 % from an average of 72% over the past three years; 68% nationally, up from an average of 60% over the past three years).

Yet despite upward adjustments in perceptions of what constitutes an adequate nest-egg, the vast majority of employees are nowhere near reaching their goals – 75% nationally and 74% in Saskatchewan say they have put aside less than a quarter of what they will need in retirement (up from an average of 73% and 70% respectively over the past three years). And even among employees closer to retirement (50 and older), a disturbing 47% of employees nationally (and 43% of employees provincially) are still less than a quarter of the way there, indicating a significant retirement savings gap, according to Culhane.

Debt overwhelms many

Over one-third of employees (39% nationally and 34% in Saskatchewan) say they feel overwhelmed by their level of debt (up from an average of 32% and 29% respectively over the past two years). Nationally, 1 % of respondents this year indicate they do not think they will ever be debt free, and one-third say their debt has increased from last year.

The number one step that employees believe they can take to improve their financial situation is to earn more (27%), while spending less dropped to second place from last year and decreasing debt remained flat. “Earning more is not always feasible,” says Culhane. The CPA suggests that automatic savings through payroll is the best strategy for financial well-being.

The Saskatchewan Pension Plan allows members to contribute up to $2,500/year to their SPP account using a credit card online, through online banking, automatic debit from their bank account or credit card or by sending a cheque. Up to $10,000/year can also be transferred to SPP from a personal RRSP.

Companies can also set up SPP in the workplace and employee contributions can be made by payroll deduction.