Tag Archives: CPA

Oct 2: Best from the blogosphere

Recently Kyle Prevost (Young and Thrifty) hosted the online Canadian Financial Summit which included video presentations and interviews with 25 Canadian personal finance experts. While the presentations were free from September 13-16, you can still buy a pass to view these presentations.

Blogs by many of these people are regularly featured in SPP’s Best from the Blogosphere, but there were some interesting people on the agenda who are new to me. Today I introduce you to some of their recent work.

Alyssa Fischer is the writer behind one of Canada’s top up and coming blogs MixedUpMoney.com. In How My Accountability Buddy Became My Secret Financial Weapon she writes that grocery shopping with her husband is important because they help each other stick to their budget. She says, “If I let myself spend money in a frivolous fashion each time I needed a pick me up, I would be right back where I was 3 years ago. In debt, maxed out, and over my limit.”

Martin Dasko on Studenomics graduated from college debt-free and the purpose of his blog is to help readers get to financial freedom by age 30 (no debt, money saved, and the ability to do whatever they want). In Why You Should Save $10k in The Next Six Months (and how to start) he explains that personal finance is often about habits and choices. “You may decide to find new ways to make more money or spend less.  Having money in the bank will make your life better because you will have options and you can plan your next move,” Dasko notes.

Chris Enns is an opera-singing-financial-planning-farmboy and the man behind Ragstoreasonable.com. He wonders whether he can be an artist and be profitable. He also questions the following core beliefs  so many carry in the creative industry.

  • That breaking even is enough.
  • That paying the bills is enough.
  • That building a profitable creative business is next to impossible.

He recognizes that wanting just “enough” to live his life is holding him back in a huge way. Instead he says shifting his thinking to “making a profit” is more likely to pave the way to building his savings and planning for the future.

Janine Rogan is the talented writer and CPA behind JanineRogan.com.  Rogan suggests that if your bank balance is too high you are more likely to spend too much. For example, even though you have $15,000 sitting in your chequing account, some (or all) of that money may be spoken for.

But you may feel you can splurge because you have extra cash on hand. Therefore she suggests that you should set guidelines for a maximum bank balance in your chequing account and once you hit that threshold excess cash should be moved to a savings or investment account.

Rogan says, “Shifting the expectation to living on less because you only have a set amount of cash in your bank account means that you will function in more of a frugal mind set.”

Half-banked.com is Desirae Odjick’s personal finance blog for millennials who want to manage their money and still have a life. She offers Five ways to learn about money for free (without leaving the house). They include:

  • Taking out a stack of books from your local library.
  • Watching money videos on YouTube.
  • Reading a whole pile of financial blogs.
  • Tracking your spending.
  • Visiting the Canadian Financial Summit .


Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?” Share the information on http://wp.me/P1YR2T-JR and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.

Written by Sheryl Smolkin
Sheryl Smolkin LLB., LLM is a retired pension lawyer and President of Sheryl Smolkin & Associates Ltd. For over a decade, she has enjoyed a successful encore career as a freelance writer specializing in retirement, employee benefits and workplace issues. Sheryl and her husband Joel are empty-nesters, residing in Toronto with their cockapoo Rufus.

More Saskatchewan residents living pay cheque to pay cheque

By Sheryl Smolkin

SHUTTERSTOCK

More working Canadians and Saskatchewan residents are living pay cheque to pay cheque, As a result they are saving less and falling further behind in meeting their retirement goals according to the sixth annual National Payroll Week Research Survey, conducted by the Canadian Payroll Association (CPA). 

Nationally, more than half of employees (51%) report that it would be difficult to meet their financial obligations if their pay cheque was delayed by a single week. In Saskatchewan, the percentage is even higher – 56% say they are living pay cheque to pay cheque, up from an average of 52% over the previous three years.

Another finding confirms that more than a quarter of those surveyed are living very close to the edge. A total of 26% say they probably could not pull together $2,000 over the next month if an emergency expense arose. In Saskatchewan, 28% would be hard pressed to come up with the funds.

The low savings rate has become even more prevalent this year. Half of all employees nationally (57% in Saskatchewan) are putting away just 5% or less of their pay, up from an average of 47% of employees over the past three years (41% in Saskatchewan). Financial planning experts generally recommend a retirement savings rate of 10% of net pay.

Part of the reason for low savings is that 44% of employees nationally, and 54% of employees in Saskatchewan, are spending all, or more than, their net pay. Among the top reasons for increased spending, the survey identifies: children, home renovations and education.

“Those who are trying to save but finding it hard to succeed should consider directing a portion of net pay into a separate savings account and/or a retirement savings program,” says CPA President and CEO, Patrick Culhane. “They can speak to their organization’s payroll practitioner to arrange this.” 

Retiring older and needing more retirement savings 

Fully 79% of Canadian employees and 75% of Saskatchewan employees expect to delay retirement until age 60 or older – up from 70% and 57% respectively over the past three years. The number one reason cited for retiring later in life is that employees are not able to save enough money.

Employees continue to raise the bar in terms of what they think they will need to retire comfortably:

  • Fewer now feel that savings under $500,000 will be sufficient (10% in Saskatchewan, down from an average of 11% over the past three years; 18% nationally, down from an average of 21% over the past three years).
  • Many think between $500,000 and $2 million will be required (71% in Saskatchewan, down 1 % from an average of 72% over the past three years; 68% nationally, up from an average of 60% over the past three years).

Yet despite upward adjustments in perceptions of what constitutes an adequate nest-egg, the vast majority of employees are nowhere near reaching their goals – 75% nationally and 74% in Saskatchewan say they have put aside less than a quarter of what they will need in retirement (up from an average of 73% and 70% respectively over the past three years). And even among employees closer to retirement (50 and older), a disturbing 47% of employees nationally (and 43% of employees provincially) are still less than a quarter of the way there, indicating a significant retirement savings gap, according to Culhane.

Debt overwhelms many

Over one-third of employees (39% nationally and 34% in Saskatchewan) say they feel overwhelmed by their level of debt (up from an average of 32% and 29% respectively over the past two years). Nationally, 1 % of respondents this year indicate they do not think they will ever be debt free, and one-third say their debt has increased from last year.

The number one step that employees believe they can take to improve their financial situation is to earn more (27%), while spending less dropped to second place from last year and decreasing debt remained flat. “Earning more is not always feasible,” says Culhane. The CPA suggests that automatic savings through payroll is the best strategy for financial well-being.

The Saskatchewan Pension Plan allows members to contribute up to $2,500/year to their SPP account using a credit card online, through online banking, automatic debit from their bank account or credit card or by sending a cheque. Up to $10,000/year can also be transferred to SPP from a personal RRSP.

Companies can also set up SPP in the workplace and employee contributions can be made by payroll deduction.