Tag Archives: Yearly Maximum Pensionable Earnings

SPP contribution levels rise, says General Manager Katherine Strutt*

 

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Today, I’m very pleased to be talking to Katherine Strutt, general manager of the Saskatchewan Pension Plan. She has some exciting news to share with us about enhancements to the program, including an increase to the SPP maximum annual contribution level effective immediately for the 2017 tax year.

SPP is the only plan of its kind in Canada — a retirement savings plan, which does not require an employee/employer relationship. As a result, it can be of particular benefit to individuals with little or no access to a pension plan.

Welcome, Katherine.

Thank you, Sheryl.

Q: For the last seven years the maximum annual contribution SPP members with RRSP contribution room could make was $2,500. How has that changed?
A: As you indicated, the maximum annual contribution limit was increased to $6,000 effective January 29, 2018, and it can be used for the 2017 tax year. However, members must still have available RRSP room in order to contribute the full $6,000 but the limit is now indexed as well, starting in 2019.

Q: If a member contributes $6,000 until age 65 how much will his or her pension be?
A: We estimated that someone contributing for 25 years and retiring at age 65 can end up with a pension of about $2,446 a monthbased on an 8% return over the period. However, we encourage people to use the wealth calculator on our website because they can insert their own assumptions. And if they want a more detailed estimate they can call our office.

Q: Can a spouse contribute for his or her partner if that person doesn’t have earned income and how much can the contribution be?
A: The SPP is a unique pension plan in that spousal contributions are acceptable. So, for instance, my spouse has to be a member. But I can contribute to his account and my account up to $6,000 each if I have the available RRSP room. If I’m making a spousal contribution, the money goes into his account, but I get the tax receipt. Other pension plans don’t offer that option. You could have a spousal RRSP, but with SPP you can actually have a spousal pension plan.

Q: Oh, that’s really fantastic. So actually, in effect, in a one-income family, the wage earner would get $12,000 contribution room for the year.
A: Yes, as long as they have available RRSP room, that’s for sure.

Q: That’s a really neat feature. And to confirm, members can contribute the full $6,000 for the 2017 tax year?
A: Yes, they can. Because we’re in the stub period right now, any contribution made between now and March 1st can qualify for the 2017 tax year.

Q: Have you had any feedback on the increased contribution level? If members are just finding out about the increase now, how much of an uptake do you expect given that, you know, maybe they haven’t saved the money or they haven’t allowed for it?

A: We’ve already had some members that have done it. I can’t tell you how many, but I was checking some deposits yesterday, and I saw that some people have already topped up their contributions. We anticipate that people who contribute on a monthly basis will start increasing their monthly contributions because they have an opportunity to do so. But it will be really hard to know until after March 1st how many people actually topped up their 2017 contributions.

The response has been very, very positive from members. They have wanted this for a long time. The new indexing feature is also very attractive as the $6,000 contribution will increase along with changes to the YMPE (yearly maximum pensionable earnings) every year.

Q: How much can a member transfer into the plan from another RRSP? Has that amount changed?
A: No, that amount has not changed. That remains at $10,000. But the board is continuing to lobby to get that limit raised.

Q: Another change announced at the same time is that work is beginning immediately on a variable pension option at retirement. Can you explain to me what that means and why it will be attractive to many members?
A: We have a lot of members who want to stay with us when they retire, but they’re not particularly interested in an annuity because annuity rates are low, and they do not want to lock their money in. They prefer a variable benefit type of option, but until now their only way of getting one has been to transfer their balance out of the SPP to another financial institution.

The new variable benefit payable directly out of our fund will be similar to  prescribed registered retirement income funds, to which people currently can transfer their account balances.

It will provide members with flexibility and control over when and how much retirement income to withdraw, and investment earnings will continue to grow on a tax-sheltered basis. Those members who want to stay and get the benefit of the low MER and the good, solid returns I think will be attracted to this new option.

Some members may wish to annuitize a portion of their account and retain the balance as a variable benefit. This will ensure they have some fixed income, but also the flexibility to withdraw additional amounts for a major expense like a trip, for instance.

Q: Now, what’s the difference between contributing to an RRSP and SPP?
A: In some respects, they’re very similar in that contributions to the SPP are part of your total RRSP contribution limit. One of the biggest advantages I think that SPP has is it is a pure pension plan. It’s not a temporary savings account. It’s meant to provide you income in your retirement.

All of the funds of the members, are pooled for investment purposes, and you get access to top money managers no matter what your account balance is or how much you contribute. Typically those services are only available to higher net worth individuals, but members of SPP get that opportunity regardless of their income level.

And the low MER (management expense ratio) that in 2017 was 83 basis points, or 0.83 is a significant feature of SPP. Solid returns, and the pure pension plan, I think those are things that make us different from an RRSP. We are like a company pension plan, if you are lucky enough to have access to a company pension plan. That’s what we provide to people regardless of whether or not their employer is involved.

Q: If a member still has RRSP contribution room after maxing out SPP contributions, can he or she make additional RRSP contributions in the same year?
A: You bet. Your limit is what CRA gives you, and how you invest that is up to you. So for instance, people that are part of a pension plan might have some additional available RRSP room left over. They can also then contribute to the SPP and get a benefit from their own personal account, in addition to what they are getting from their workplace pension.

Q: MySPP also went live in late January. Can you tell me some of the features of MySPP, and what member reaction has been to gaining online access to SPP data?
A: The reaction from members has been very positive. They’ve been asking for this for a while, and we did a bit of a soft roll out the end of January with a great response. Then members are going to be getting information with their statements, and we expect an even bigger uptake.

Once they’ve set up an account, they can go in and see the personal information we have on file for them, who they’ve named as their beneficiary, when the last time was that they made a contribution and what their account balance is. Furthermore, if they’ve misplaced a tax receipt or can’t find their statement, they can see those things online.

Retired members can get T4A information and see when their pension payments went into their accounts. So it’s a first step, and we think it’s a really positive one, and we’re getting some really good feedback from our members.

Q: Finally, to summarize in your own words, why do you think the annual increase in the SPP contribution level, introduction of a variable benefit and MySPP makes Saskatchewan Pension Plan a better pension plan than ever for Canadians aged 18 to 71?
A: Well, I think that by having an increased contribution limit that is indexed, the program might be more relevant to people. It certainly will be a bonus I think to employers who wanted to match their employee contributions but were running up against the old limit. This will give them more opportunity to do so.

It will also improve the sustainability of SPP over the long term as people are investing more. The variable benefit we’ve introduced will give retiring members more options, and it will allow them to keep going with this tried and true organization well into their retirement.

MySPP  allows members access to their account information whenever they wish, 24/7 on all their devices. That will be attractive to younger prospective members.

Exciting times. Thank you, Katherine. It’s been a pleasure to chat with you again.

Thanks so much, Sheryl.

*This is an edited transcript of an interview recorded 1/31/2018.

Written by Sheryl Smolkin
Sheryl Smolkin LLB., LLM is a retired pension lawyer and President of Sheryl Smolkin & Associates Ltd. For over a decade, she has enjoyed a successful encore career as a freelance writer specializing in retirement, employee benefits and workplace issues. Sheryl and her husband Joel are empty-nesters, residing in Toronto with their cockapoo Rufus.

How much will I get from CPP?

By Sheryl Smolkin

A pension from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) is an important foundation on which most Canadians will build their retirement income. Therefore it is important to understand how much you will be entitled to at retirement.[i]

The maximum monthly amount you can receive if you retire at age 65 in 2015 is $1,065. Service Canada reports that in October 2014 the average pension for new beneficiaries was $610.57. That’s because applicants only got a full pension if they contributed the maximum amount up to the Yearly Maximum Pensionable Earnings (YMPE) for at least 40 years between ages 18 and 65.

The YMPE in 2014 was $52,500 and it increased to $53,600 in 2015. Therefore this year the maximum CPP contribution for both employers and employees is $2,479.95. Self-employed people must remit up to $4,959.90. If you earn more than the YMPE you will notice a “salary bump” part way through the year once you have made maximum CPP (and Employment Insurance) contributions.

CPP offers protection against periods where you had reduced or zero earnings for general reasons (up to eight years) or child-rearing  by automatically dropping a number of months of your lowest earnings when calculating your CPP benefit. You can start collecting CPP at age 60 but your annual pension will be reduced by .58% per month prior to age 65 (rising to .6% per month in 2016). If you take an early CPP pension and go back to work, you must continue to pay into the plan until at least age 65. CPP contributions for working Canadians over age 65 are optional until age 70.

When you are already receiving a CPP pension, contributions between ages 60 and 70 increase your benefit by a lifetime Post-Retirement benefit (PRB). The maximum annual PRB you can earn in 2015 is $319.56 and it will be added to your benefit payments in the next year.

CPP uses a Statement of Contributions to keep a record of your pensionable earnings and your contributions to the Plan. The Statement of Contributions can assist you in your retirement planning.

Your statement shows your total CPP contributions for each year and the earnings on which your contributions are based. If you contributed the maximum there will be a letter “M” beside the year. In addition, it provides an estimate of what your pension or benefit would be if you and/or your family were eligible to receive it now.

You can view and print a copy of your Statement of Contributions online. You will need to request a Personal Access code that will be sent to you by mail.

You can also request a hard copy of your statement from:
Contributor Client Services
Canada Pension Plan
Service Canada
PO Box 9750 Postal Station T
Ottawa ON K1G 3Z4

Table 1: CPP Contributions and Benefits

CPP 2014 2015
CONTRIBUTION AND BENEFIT LEVELS
Year’s Maximum Pensionable Earnings $52,500.00 $53,600.00
Contribution Rate – Employee/Employer 4.95% 4.95%
Maximum Contribution – Employee/Employer $2,425.50 $2,479.95
Year’s Basic Exemption $3,500.00 $3,500.00
Pensionable Earnings* $49,000.00 $50,100.00
RETIREMENT BENEFIT MAXIMUM
Monthly pension on retirement during the year at age 65 $1,038.33 $1,065.00
OTHER BENEFIT MAXIMA
Monthly Survivor’s Benefit
Spouse age < 65 $567.91 $581.13
Spouse age = 65 $623.00 $639.00
CPP Flat Rate Component:
Survivor’s Benefit
$178.54 $181.75
Monthly Disability Benefit
Maximum $1,236.35 $1,264.59
Flat rate component $457.60 $465.84
Lump Sum Death Benefit $2,500.00 $2,500.00
Deceased/Disabled Contributor’s Child Benefit $230.72 $234.87
INDEXATION RATE 0.9% 1.8%

* This figure represents the Year’s Maximum Pensionable earnings minus the Year’s Basic Exemption.

Also read How to Calculate Your CPP Retirement Pension

[i] Disability benefits and survivor benefits are also payable from CPP. See Table above.