SEPT 12: BEST FROM THE BLOGOSPHERE

September 12, 2022

Some clever ways to tuck away more money in your retirement piggy bank

Writing for the GoBankingRates blog, Jami Farkas comes up with some “clever” ways to save more for our collective retirements.

First, the article suggests, use an online calculator to figure out how much you need to save. There are plenty of these, and the Saskatchewan Pension Plan’s own Wealth Calculator can show you how much your savings can grow.

Next, the article urges, make savings automatic. “Don’t give yourself the option of whether to set aside money each month. Automate your savings so it’s not a choice,” the article suggests, quoting David Brooks Sr., president of Retire SMART. This option is available to SPP members too – you can arrange to make pre-authorized contributions to your account.

If you are in any sort of retirement arrangement at work, be sure you are contributing to the max, the article notes. And if there is no employer match to your retirement savings, “set up your own match” by giving up a cup of coffee daily, the article suggests.

Once you’ve started automatically saving for life after work, be sure to bump up your annual rate of contributions every year, the article tells us. “A 25-year-old earning $40,000 a year who contributes just one per cent more of his salary each year (or $33 more each month) until age 67 would have $3,870 of additional yearly income in retirement, assuming a seven per cent rate of return and a 1.5 per annual pay raise,” the article explains.

It’s the same, the article continues, for raises. If you get one, so should your retirement savings – stash some or all of it into savings. “Since workers are already accustomed to living on their existing salary, they won’t notice money that they never had before is missing,” the article explains.

We’ll Canadianize the next tips – consider putting some or all of your tax refund back into retirement savings, such as your SPP account or a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA). A few of the ideas for saving in this article, intended for a U.S. audience, aren’t available here, but remember that SPP operates similarly to a registered retirement savings plan, so contributions you make to it are tax-deductible. If you put money in a TFSA, there’s no tax deduction but as is the case with both vehicles, your money grows tax-free. And with a TFSA there’s no tax payable when you take the money out.

Other ideas – don’t downsize after you retire, but before when you can more readily afford to move, the article suggests.

Spare change can power your savings, the article adds. “Tossing spare change in a jar might seem like an old-fashioned approach to saving, but you’d be surprised how quickly your nickels, dimes and quarters can add up,” the article notes. Do the same with any money you save on purchases using coupons or apps, we are told.

We’ll add one more to this list. If you get a gift card that can be spent like cash anywhere, why not add it to your SPP account? SPP permits contributions to be made from credit cards, so it’s a nice way to turn a gift, or a rebate, into retirement income for your future self.

Join the Wealthcare Revolution – follow SPP on Facebook!

Written by Martin Biefer

Martin Biefer is Senior Pension Writer at Avery & Kerr Communications in Nepean, Ontario. A veteran reporter, editor and pension communicator, he’s now a freelancer. Interests include golf, line dancing and classic rock, and playing guitar. Got a story idea? Let Martin know via LinkedIn.

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