Tag Archives: $he Thinks I’m Cheap

Sept 16: Best from the blogosphere

By Sheryl Smolkin

blogospheregraphic

This week we share links to blogs about RESPs, insurance and applying for a first job.

If you are still paying off student loans and you don’t want your kids to be burdened with debt, you may be thinking about starting Registered Educational Savings Plans for them. On Retire Happy, Jim Yih discusses the RESP contribution and withdrawal rules.

As a result of flooding over the past several years Robb Engen says his home insurance bill is up by 30%.  In the end he decided to renew the policy as is and start budgeting more for house insurance premiums (and the deductible for possible claims) now and in the future.

In an archived blog, Gail Vaz-Oxlade explains why you shouldn’t buy mortgage insurance, flight accident insurance or accidental death insurance. Don’t forget to read the comments which are almost as interesting as the content.

Recruitment season can be very stressful for students in their final year. On BrighterLife.ca Christine Kang says applying for a first job is like going on a first date and give hints on how you can make a good first impression.

And when that long-awaited job offer comes, Andrew on $he Thinks I’m Cheap says it’s time to negotiate the best possible salary. That’s because a small increase can mean big money when you consider the benefits of compounding, pension contributions, bonuses and other benefits.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere. Share the information with us on http://wp.me/P1YR2T-JR and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.

Apr 8: Best from the blogosphere

By Sheryl Smolkin

blogospheregraphic

“Best from Blogosphere” took a week off due to the Easter break, but our favourite bloggers just kept on writing. Therefore this issue reports on 10 interesting blog posts, rather than the usual five.

Contemplating winters in a warmer climate? Read the key questions Jim Yih on retirehappy says you should ask about retirement in a different country.

Saskatchewan blogger Tim Stubbs tells us on Canadian Dream: Free at 45   how he spent the week before Easter shovelling snow off his roof and away from his foundations to try and avoid a flooded basement.

On Brighter Life, Deanne Gage offers home-staging tips from the pros for those of you selling your house this spring and important information about insurance coverage for single parents with children.

$he Thinks I’m Cheap blogger Andrew explores the touchy subject of money and relationships. His rule #1 is do not discuss money on the first date!

If you are planning a one day or longer shopping trip to the U.S. check out articles on the Canadian Finance Blog about new cross-border shopping exemptions and how to save money on hotel rooms.

Continuing with a shopping theme, on Boomer and Echo, Robb Engen investigates how much you have to spend to make a Costco executive membership worth buying and Gail Vaz-Oxlade says companies marketing to women should cut the cute stuff and take them seriously.

And last but not least, Squawkfox (Kerry K. Taylor) gives detailed instructions on how to make a healthier McDonald’s Egg McMuffin for 65% less. We are NOT surprised that she managed to both cut the calories and cut the cost.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?”  Send us an email with the information to socialmedia@saskpension.com and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.

Feb 18: Best from the blogosphere

By Sheryl Smolkin

blogospheregraphic

As we contemplate retirement somewhere down the road, most of us are probably focused on how to save enough money. However, deciding how we are going to spend our time is equally important.

Dave Dineen on Brighter Life says if you have debt you are not ready to retire and provides a check-list for a debt-free retirement.

$he Thinks I’m Cheap blogger Andrew suggests that in addition to investing in stocks and bonds, planning how you will use your time, skills and health are three critical areas that should not be ignored when creating a retirement budget.

On Retire Happy, Donna McCaw discusses how planning retirement is a little like planning a honeymoon. You have to think about what happens after the first few months.

Guest blogger Robert writes on Canadian Dream: Free at 45 that since he retired he is busier than ever, volunteering, training for a triathlon and taking courses towards a Masters degree in Education at the University of Calgary.

And finally, readers of all ages will be interested Boomer & Echo’s 20 tips to save money on gas. But be wary of companies that try to sell you mileage-improving devices and fuel additives.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?”  Send us an email with the information to socialmedia@saskpension.com and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.

Jan 28: Best from the blogosphere

By Sheryl Smolkin

blogospheregraphic

Have you ever wished you could lock the door and take off for a year?

As I was looking for material to feature this week, I discovered an interesting blog for the first time.

On $he Thinks I’m Cheap Toronto blogger Andrew Martin aims to help Canadians make more money by sharing facts, stories and advice.

Beginning in early December, Andrew did a Career Break Survey. Then in subsequent blogs he discussed the survey results and how you can save in order to travel long-term.

Andrew is also a guest blogger on our perennial favourite Boomer & Echo. If you made a New Year’s resolution to eat less and work out more, you will be interested in his contribution this week about mobile technology that can improve your health.

For fans of passive investing, in Revisiting the Couch Potato Model Portfolios Dan Bortolotti discloses how and why he recently tweaked his holdings, although generally he does not advocate jumping from fund to fund.

And squawkfox, Kerry K. Taylor is the first to agree that making your own peanut butter is not going to save you mega millions, but her research (and recipes) reveal that you will save 37% by making your own organic peanut butter at home a savings of $1.37 per 500g jar.

Do you follow blogs with terrific ideas for saving money that haven’t been mentioned in our weekly “Best from the blogosphere?”  Send us an email with the information to socialmedia@saskpension.com and your name will be entered in a quarterly draw for a gift card.