Thrift stores – looking sharp while spending much less!

We’ve seen, time and time again, that the best way to save money is to spend less than you earn.  Sounds easy, but in practice, it can be difficult. That’s where thrift stores can become handy.

At the Debt.com blog, shopping for clothes at thrift stores is discussed, and a few tips are offered. First, the blog notes, “look for new clothing” at the thrift store – clothes that often still have tags on them and have never been worn. Often, the blog says, people donate clothes that don’t fit, or were gifts they didn’t like. “After some practice,” the blog advises, “it is easy to spot the never-washed creases of new clothing.”

Other tips? The blog advises that you “take your time” and check the clothing racks thoroughly. “You’ll need to spend some time pushing hangers around while searching for quality stuff,” the blog notes, adding that you need to separate “the wheat from the chaff” to find gently-used, well-cared-for clothing.

Other tips from the blog – don’t “settle” for something just because it’s cheap, focus on getting high quality only. Take note of which thrift stores offer the best stuff, and frequent those ones more.

You can, reports the Budget 101 blog, go even farther than just clothes or home furnishings. Some people are finding that a thrift store-backed wedding can save you a fortune on the cost of your big day.  “Recycling, re-purposing and some creative thinking will go a long way to cultivating a wedding experience you will be proud to share with your loved ones, and something to feel good about for years to come. What a great way to start a life together,” the blog states.

How would such a wedding look? Many wedding dresses are donated after they have been used, and are of course lightly worn. “Why purchase a brand-new dress that will serve you for just one day when you could use that money traveling and making memories on your honeymoon or purchase some new furniture,” the blog asks. A used wedding dress can be had for a tiny fraction of the thousands to tens of thousands a new one costs, the blog adds.  Other “thrifty” ideas include getting some used vases or mason jars to help with flowers or centerpieces, the blog notes.

In an article on decluttering, the Vancouver Sun notes that having “donate” and “sell” bins in your home, with donations going to your local thrift shop, is a great way to create more room in your existing space – always less expensive than moving. The decluttering “craze” in North America has actually created “an uptick” in donations to thrift shops, the article notes.

One of our family’s little savings maxims is this – you can avoid paying the full price for something by getting it on sale, getting it used, or getting it free (donated to you). Thrift stores are great, since you never know what you’re going to find on offer. It’s the only store you go to where you don’t really know what you might buy. But over the years we’ve found deals on golf clubs, tools, clothes, furniture, small appliances, dishes – the list goes on and on.

When you blast out of the bunker with a $4 sand wedge, your pleasure is doubled!

When you blast out of the bunker with a $4 sand wedge, your pleasure is doubled! And it frees up money for retirement savings – check out the Saskatchewan Pension Plan to see how your savings can be put to work for you.

Written by Martin Biefer
Martin Biefer is Senior Pension Writer at Avery & Kerr Communications in Nepean, Ontario. A veteran reporter, editor and pension communicator, he’s now a freelancer. Interests include golf, line dancing and classic rock. He and his wife live with their Shelties, Duncan and Phoebe, and cat, Toobins. You can follow him on Twitter – his handle is @AveryKerr22

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